3 John – Hospitality

Read 3 John

We often talk about those who have the gift of hospitality as being those who can put on a good dinner party or those who like to have people over to their house.  Certainly, there is an element of truth to this notion and there are many who are gifted with a welcoming spirit and an open home.  However, Scripture challenges our this notion, pointing out that if hospitality means only welcoming those we know, those we like, and those who believe the same way that we do, it falls short of the true meaning of hospitality.

Here John commends his friend Gaius because of his faithful work and love toward those he does not know.  These people are, apparently, Christians but are strangers to Gaius.  However, Gaius continues on in what he is doing for the sake of the Gospel and receives a commendation from Paul for it.

This is contrasted with the actions of Diotrephes who always wants to be first, the very opposite of hospitality.  John, here, is echoing Jesus’ teachings to His disciples, talking about servant leadership and humility rather than boastful, proud talk.  Such actions are not hospitable and are, in essence, wounding the message of the Gospel.

As is always true, the example that we follow is that of Jesus Christ.  Paul speaks to the humility and hospitality of Jesus in the book of Colossians:

Who, being in very nature God, did not consider equality with God something to be used to his own advantage; rather, he made himself nothing    by taking the very nature of a servant, being made in human likeness.

And being found in appearance as a man, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to death— even death on a cross!

Therefore God exalted him to the highest place and gave him the name that is above every name, that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue acknowledge that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.

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