Revelation 10 – Sweet and Sour

Read Revelation 10

The happenings of chapter 10 seem somewhat disjointed from the events that surround this chapter.  However, the imagery that is contained here is once again intimately connected to Old Testament prophetic writings.  Because of this, we can once again see a connection between God’s work in the Old Testament and that of the New Testament.  Remember that the Old Testament is an important anchor for our reading here, revealing to us that God is continuing to work out His plan of for saving the world and defeating evil.John records another interlude, a break in the action before the 7th trumpet is going to sound.  Once again, a “mighty angel,” perhaps the same one that we met in chapter 5 appears with a scroll.  This time, however, the scroll is much smaller and is open, different from the scroll with the seven seals.

John records another interlude, a break in the action before the 7th trumpet is going to sound.  Once again, a “mighty angel,” perhaps the same one that we met in chapter 5 appears with a scroll.  This time, however, the scroll is much smaller and is open, different from the scroll with the seven seals.  The angel’s appearance draws from a great deal of Old Testament imagery as well.  Most people are familiar, at least in part, with the story of Noah; the angel with a rainbow above his head is a reminder of God’s promise never again to destroy the earth with a flood.  Ezekiel also sees an image like this in his first vision.  Given the Exodus imagery that we’ve already seen, the pillars of fire may be reminders of God’s guidance in that time as well.  His face “like the sun” is similar language to many encounters with angels or with God, which we call theophanies, and is the same language used to talk about Jesus in the transfiguration and at the beginning of Revelation.

Placing his feet on both land and sea gives the impression of power over the whole earth and with a roar like a lion, perhaps we are getting the impression that the “Lion of the Tribe of Judah,” that is Jesus, is claiming His Lordship over all things. Hosea speaks to a similar vision late in his book.

John then hears thunder in response to this roar which is often symbolic for the punishment that comes from God to the wicked.  This is more than likely connects what we have been reading to the moment now, linking the judgments to God.  As John continues to record, he is given directions not to tell what the seven thunders have said.  Something similar happens several times in the book of Daniel (chapters 8 and 12), perhaps indicating something to deep or great for us to know at this time.  At the end of Revelation, however, John is instructed not to seal up any of the words he has written.  Some knowledge, it seems, may be time sensitive, but in the end, God’s plan and love will be revealed to all.

Verses 5 through 7 are all likely linked to the persecution that was taking place at the time John wrote the book of Revelation.  These are also words of hope for those who have faced and will face persecution in their lifetime.  This link comes from the name that is given to God here: “him who lives for ever and ever, who created the heavens and all that is in them, the earth and all that is in it, and the sea and all that is in it.”  The name reflects the name that Jesus was introduced by in Revelation 1 and also communicates God’s full and total reign over all things.  The oath that is sworn here is reflective of the covenant promise that God made with His people, starting with Abraham, and continuing throughout the Old Testament.  Here too God is swearing to bring His people into the true promised land, a promise that will never fade no matter the circumstances we find ourselves in.

Finally, we see John taking part in the action, taking the scroll from the angel.  A similar scene unfolds in the books of Jeremiah and Ezekiel.  Oddly, John is told to eat the scroll, which will taste sweet in his mouth but turn sour in his stomach.  The eating of the scroll is symbolic of the taking in of its words, grasping fully what they say and making them a part of you.  We use similar language when we talk about reading the Word of God.

At first, for John, the scroll tastes sweet, just as the message of the Gospel is like honey on our lips.  It is sweet, inviting, and very desirable.  However, the message of the Gospel isn’t an invitation to the easy life, there is suffering that is involved.  Jesus talks about this in the Gospel of John saying, “In this world, you will face trouble, but take heart, I have overcome the world.”  This too is an indication for us of both the arc of the narrative being revealed here in Revelation and the path that we are on as followers of Jesus Christ.  Still, as John is called to prophesy about what he is seeing, to and about all the peoples, nations, languages, and kings, we too are called on this outward trajectory, living into the great commission and preaching the Gospel to all people.

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